Part of a Whole

My name is Nicolas Steenhout.
I speak, train, and consult about inclusion, accessibility and disability.

A Cartoon

I was talking with someone who suggested this cartoon idea. I’m not an artist, but taking a little inspiration from OneFTE, I went ahead and "drew" this.

Cartoon

Cartoon Description

The cartoon shows two people talking together. The conversation goes like this:

Person 1: Amputees are an ugly sight. They should stay at home.
Person 2: There go Sarah Bernhart and Admiral Lord Nelson.

Person 1: People in wheelchairs should live in nursing homes.
Person 2: There go Stephen Hawking and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Person 1: The blind should live in their own institutions.
Person 2: There go Stevie Wonder and Helen Keller.

Person 1: The deaf should not be mixing with us.
Person 2: There goes Beethoven. Oh! And Helen Keller again.

Person 1: The mentally ill would be better off in psychiatric hospitals.
Person 2: There go Robin Williams, Buzz Aldrin and Winston Churchill

Person 1: Suddenly, I feel very lonely…

Update: A response from OneFTE

I shared this comic with Stuart from OneFTE.com and he came back with one of his own. He gave me permission to post it here.

Two people talking. One is a barista making a coffee for the other.

Person 1: They should send all people with disabilities somewhere so we don’t have to cater for their needs wherever we go.
Person 2: When they add ignorance to that list, who’s going to make my coffee?

There is a caption reading: “IGNORANCE. There is no greater disability”

7 thoughts on “A Cartoon

  1. I’ve heard a variation of the first line most of my life.
    Unfortunately, too many people of influence in my early years associated a physical disability with an intellectual disability.
    It limited my own expectations of what I could achieve.
    Through perseverance, some wonderful support, and commitment to public service, I had the opportunity to grow into a level of confidence and expertise that has opened some doors a bit wider.
    I’ve outlived most of those stereotypes and proven them wrong. Archaic attitudes are still something I face regularly.
    Sadly, it is some the younger generation, obsessed with perfection, that will be the next barrier.
    Recently overheard: “People like that shouldn’t be allowed out” from some teeny-boppers as I went into a convenience store.
    Sad.

  2. Hey Steve, it is unfortunate indeed.

    I’ve been told to my face “I pay taxes so people like you can be in nursing homes”…

    *shrug*

  3. Good one, Nic. I would also add Rachmaninof to the bunch for mental illness. :-)

  4. Great cartoons. The ignorance one cracked me up. :)

    BTW I am constantly fascinated by the (to me) equalizing effect of Twitter. I am clueless about the disabilities my Twitter friends/followers have unless they explicitly state something. I wish those with prejudices would learn to be as blind as Twitter, so to speak. They are also the real losers – they have no idea what great insights and friendships they are missing!

  5. Comment to the second cartoon: One can cure ignorance by education. It’s hard but not impossible. Arrogance, on the other hand, is almost impossible. I would say arrogance/bad attitude is the greatest disability.

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