Should Sighted Developers Use Screenreaders To Test Accessibility?

There is some controversy about the idea of sighted web designers and developers using screenreading software to test web sites for accessibility. Some people suggest one must use a screenreader to test their sites. Others believe it is counter productive. I think that very few sighted people can get the correct results by using screenreaders to test a website. I further think that too many people think that the accessibility testing is complete once they’ve used a screenreader on their website.

Continue reading

Thoughts on Physical vs. Web Accessibility

I received an email from a friend who is attending a11yMTL, a conference about web accessibility. Mimi is a graphic designer, who happens to be a wheelchair user. As she knows I grew up in Montréal and have accessibility of both physical structures and the web at heart, she shared with me some of her thoughts. I asked her if I could publish her email here because these are powerful consideration.

Continue reading

Paralympics NZ – When Web Professionals Don’t Do Their Job Right

It seems wrong that a disability-related organisation would have a website that is not accessible. One really shouldn’t cut out their primary market. It tends to happen when the organisation relies on "professionals" who don’t really have any idea what they are doing. And the organisation just knows that they want a website. Often, they don’t even know enough to realise they should ask about accessibility.

Continue reading

I Offer To Build An Accessible Website For The Nevada Blind Children Foundation

It appears my previous post about the Nevada Blind Children’s Foundation being "Flash only" made a lot of noise, and upset people. I had been planning to write a follow-up post. A recent post on Darrel Shandrow’s blog prompts me to write this follow-up faster than planned!

Continue reading